Portland City Walks Irvington and Sullivan’s Gulch Loop

Time for a fun date! Once again Laura O. Foster provides a great walk for us..

It’s a house that John Povey, of Povey Brothers Glass Company fame lived in! Such a charming fa├žade!

The book said Povey’s name could still be seen in the front steps. It took a bit of squinting, but Matt eventually found it and pointed it out to me. Can you see it? Look at the top step.

Portland has hosted its share of protests focused on racial injustice, police brutality and the killing of George Floyd and others. The Irvington Neighborhood was awash in signs included this Burma-Shave-type message:

Last sign says: Our Minds

We spotted this fella in some side yard bamboo.

Aside from signs, Irvington is awash in Little Free Libraries. I found a big win in this one. Look at all these postcards!

And everyone can use a neighborhood cat review.

Or two.

Cambia Todo Cambia translates as Everything Changes (or maybe Changes, Everything Changes?) You can see a delightful performance here and read the translated lyrics here.

I can tell that the Crystal Garden Apartments were built when Apartments were faaaaaaancy. Guess how!

It’s that plaque telling “tradesmen” to go around to the side.

I found a great site that has a list of apartment houses, including the Crystal Garden Apartments. The same site also has two images of my beloved Rose-Friend Apartment, now torn down, but forever in my heart as my first Portland home. Actually, I’ve now just spent 15 minutes clicking around the site which includes an interactive map with current and destroyed Apartment Houses. There were apparently three other apartment houses in the next block over from my beloved Rose-Friends Apartments. This is a fabulous site and you should check it out. The Apartment House in Portland.

I wonder if the cat at 1538 and the dog at 1530 are aware of each other’s presence.

This gorgeous house has unique window covers on the second story.

Names of Black people killed by police.

I also thought these signs were beautiful despite the sadness that comes with them having to be made in the first place.

This was a great walk! Thanks Portland City Walks!

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